GSM vs 3G Tecnology

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3G

3G is the third generation of telecommunication hardware standards and general technology for mobile networking.
3G is the third generation of telecommunication hardware standards and general technology for mobile networking, superseding 2.5G. It is based on the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) family of standards under the IMT-2000.[1]
3G networks enable network operators to offer users a wider range of more advanced services while achieving greater network capacity through improved spectral efficiency. Services include wide-area wireless voice telephone, video calls, and broadband wireless data, all in a mobile environment. Additional features also include HSPA data transmission capabilities, which provides users with data rates up to 14.4 Mbit/s on the downlink and 5.8 Mbit/s on the uplink.
Unlike IEEE 802.11 networks, which are commonly called Wi-Fi or WLAN networks, 3G networks are wide-area cellular telephone networks which provide High-speed Internet access and video telephony to 3G Network subscribers.[2]. IEEE 802.11 networks are short range, high-bandwidth networks primarily developed for data.

GSM

GSM (Global System for Mobile communications: originally from Groupe Spécial Mobile) is the most popular standard for mobile phones in the world.

GSM (Global System for Mobile communications: originally from Groupe Spécial Mobile) is the most popular standard for mobile phones in the world. Its promoter, the GSM Association, estimates that 80% of the global mobile market uses the standard.[1] GSM is used by over 3 billion people across more than 212 countries and territories.[2][3] Its ubiquity makes international roaming very common between mobile phone operators, enabling subscribers to use their phones in many parts of the world. GSM differs from its predecessors in that both signaling and speech channels are digital, and thus is considered a second generation (2G) mobile phone system. This has also meant that data communication was easy to build into the system.

The ubiquity of the GSM standard has been an advantage to both consumers (who benefit from the ability to roam and switch carriers without switching phones) and also to network operators (who can choose equipment from any of the many vendors implementing GSM [4]). GSM also pioneered a low-cost (to the network carrier) alternative to voice calls, the Short message service (SMS, also called “text messaging”), which is now supported on other mobile standards as well. Another advantage is that the standard includes one worldwide Emergency telephone number, 112[5]. This makes it easier for international travellers to connect to emergency services without knowing the local emergency number.

Newer versions of the standard were backward-compatible with the original GSM phones. For example, Release ’97 of the standard added packet data capabilities, by means of General Packet Radio Service (GPRS). Release ’99 introduced higher speed data transmission using Enhanced Data Rates for GSM Evolution (EDGE).

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Tauseef Emraj Shehan

2 Comments

  1. sorfuddin ahmad
    sorfuddin ahmad on

    Really thanks for your sharing post & we are learn something from your post about GMS & 3G technology………………….

  2. Tauseef Emraj Shehan
    Tauseef Emraj Shehan on

    thanks for your reply. I try to post important thing, if it will helpful in your life i would glad.

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